Monthly Archives: April 2015

“what gives you the moral authority?”

So here’s something that happened to me yesterday at the AERA Annual Meeting: I gave a talk about my dissertation (.pdf)  in a roundtable sponsored by the Queer Studies Special Interest Group. I began my presentation with a rationale for my work: I talked about the material and symbolic violence committed against trans bodies and then described how misogyny and transphobia get internalized really early and that in order to counteract this it’s important to help kids think about … Read more

academic conference advice: Navigating social events

Ugh, social events. We’re all in this together, people.

Let’s be real—a super important piece of the AERA Annual Meeting is its social events. Attending business meetings, receptions, and social gatherings offers the following benefits:

  • (re)connect with people who do similar work
  • (re)connect with people who are affiliated with your current or former institution(s)
  • secure free food and/or free drinks

Everybody should go to social events, but I’m talking especially to graduate students here: These events are fantastic ways to Read more

academic conferences: advice for navigating the Q&A

ugh, AERA. I mean, hooray, AERA!

In the land of educational research, a pretty enormous conference is coming up–the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA).

I’m the Communications Chair of AERA’s Cultural-Historical Research Special Interest Group, and I sort of like distributing advice for navigating this most intimidating of conferences. Today, I’m offering advice on how to navigate one specific aspect of this conference–the question-and-answer section of presentations. Advice is divided into two sections. The first … Read more

letter of concern regarding Jack Halberstam’s position on trans identity politics, trauma, and trigger warnings

On Thursday, April 2, 2015, I attended a talk by Jack Halberstam at the University of Colorado Boulder. I was deeply concerned about the content of Dr. Halberstam’s talk, which I considered to be reflective of transphobic, transmisogynistic, and ableist discourses around identity, language use, and the impact of trauma on learning.

I know I’m not the only one who feels frustrated and disappointed by the rhetoric of Halberstam’s position on these issues (see guerilla feminism, feministing, colored Read more